ITPub博客

首页 > Linux操作系统 > Linux操作系统 > solaris的ndd指令

solaris的ndd指令

原创 Linux操作系统 作者:wilson2006 时间:2019-03-25 15:09:05 0 删除 编辑

ndd

         ndd - get and set driver configuration parameters
SYNOPSIS
     ndd [-set] driver parameter [value]
 


ndd基本功能
# ndd /dev/ip ip_forwarding 
0
 显示/dev/ip  的参数项的值
 
# ndd -set /dev/ip ip_forwarding 0
This dis-ables IPv4 packet forwarding.
 设置/dev/ip  的参数项的值
 


ndd相当于linux的sysctl

   ndd ,对/dev下文件进行 get(相当于sysctl –a)
   set(相当于 sysctl –w)处理
 

# ls /dev
allkmem     fd          kdmouse     pfil          rawip6      systty           ttyrb
arp         fssnapctl   keysock     pm            rdsk        tcp              ttyrc
bl          ibd         kmdb        poll          rmt         tcp6             ttyrd
ce          icmp        kmem        pool          rsm         term             ttyre
cfg         icmp6       kstat       poolctl       rsr0        text-0           ttyrf
conslog     ip          ksyms       printers      rts         ticlts           udp
console     ip6         llc1        ptmajor       sad         ticots           udp6
cpu         ipauth      llc2        ptmx          sctp        ticotsord        urandom

 

   # ndd /dev/tcp ?
?                             (read only)
tcp_time_wait_interval        (read and write)
tcp_ipv4_ttl                  (read and write)
tcp_keepalive_interval        (read and write)
tcp_rexmit_interval_initial   (read and write)
tcp_rexmit_interval_max       (read and write)
tcp_rexmit_interval_min       (read and write)
tcp_deferred_ack_interval     (read and write)
tcp_ignore_path_mtu           (read and write)
tcp_trace                     (read and write)
tcp_compression_enabled       (read and write)
tcp_extra_priv_ports          (read only)
tcp_extra_priv_ports_add      (write only)
tcp_extra_priv_ports_del      (write only)
tcp_status                    (read only)


   # ndd /dev/ip ?
?                             (read only)
ip_respond_to_address_mask_broadcast(read and write)
ip_respond_to_echo_broadcast  (read and write)
ip_respond_to_echo_multicast  (read and write)
ip_send_redirects             (read and write)
ip_forward_directed_broadcasts(read and write)
ip_debug                      (read and write)
ip_path_mtu_discovery         (read and write)
ip_ignore_redirect            (read and write)
ip_output_queue               (read and write)
ip_broadcast_ttl              (read and write)
ip_icmp_err_interval          (read and write)
ip_icmp_err_burst             (read and write)
ip_addrs_per_if               (read and write)
ipsec_override_persocket_policy(read and write)
ip6_respond_to_echo_multicast (read and write)
ip6_send_redirects            (read and write)
ip6_ignore_redirect           (read and write)
ip_forwarding                 (read and write)
ip6_forwarding                (read and write)


    # ndd /dev/icmp ?
?                             (read only)
icmp_wroff_extra              (read and write)
icmp_ipv4_ttl                 (read and write)
icmp_ipv6_hoplimit            (read and write)
icmp_bsd_compat               (read and write)
icmp_xmit_hiwat               (read and write)
icmp_xmit_lowat               (read and write)
icmp_recv_hiwat               (read and write)
icmp_max_buf                  (read and write)
icmp_status                   (read only)
 
# ndd /dev/icmp icmp_status
RAWIP      src addr        dest addr       state
d6b1a394 :: :: UNBOUND
 
# ndd /dev/icmp icmp_ipv4_ttl
255
 


   加一个私有口(相当于1024以下口的)
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_extra_priv_ports_add 2049    设置NFS的特定tcp端口
ndd -set /dev/udp udp_extra_priv_ports_add 2049    设置NFS的特定udp端口
 


    ndd常用在SUN双网卡提供路由功能上
缺省ip forwarding是关闭的
# ndd /dev/ip ip_forwarding 
0
 
#ndd -set /dev/ip ip_forwarding 1
 
 

SolarisTM 2.x - Tuning Your TCP/IP Stack and More


Last update: 24.05.2002 (change log)

Please check your location line carefully. If you don't see http://www.sean.de/Solaris/ in your location bar, you might want to check with the original site for the most up to date information.

Important Notice! 
SUN managed to publish a Solaris Tunable Parameters Reference Manual, applying to Solaris 8, HW 2/02, and Solaris Tunable Parameters Reference Manual, applying to Solaris 9, HW 9/02. You might want to check there for anything you miss here. Another good read is Solaris Operating Environment Network Settings for Security, if you are concerned about security and denial-of-service attacks.

Table of contents
Introduction 
1.1 History 
1.2 Quick intro into ndd 
1.3 How to read this document 
TCP connection initiation 
Retransmission related parameters 
Path MTU discovery 
Further advice, hints and remarks 
5.1 Common TCP timers 
5.2 Erratic IPX behaviors 
5.3 Common IP parameters 
5.4 TCP and UDP port related parameters 
Windows, buffers and watermarks 
Tuning your system 
7.1 Things to watch 
7.2 General entries in the file /etc/system 
7.3 System V IPC related entries 
7.4 How to find further entries 
100 Mbit ethernet and related entries

8.1 The hme interface 
8.2 Other problems 
Recommended patches 
Literature 
10.1 Books 
10.2 Internet resources 
10.3 RFC, mentioned and otherwise 
10.4 Further material 
Solaris' Future 
11.1 Solaris 7 
11.2 Solaris 8 
11.3 Solaris 9 
Uncovered material 
Scripts 
List of things to do 
Appendices are separate documents. They are quoted from within the text, but you might be interested in them when downloading the current document. If you say "print" for this document, the appendices will not be printed. You have to download and print them separately.

Simple transactions using TCP 
System V IPC parameter 
Retransmission behavior 
Slow start implications 
The change log 
Glossary (first attempt) 
Index (first attempt) 
1. Introduction
Use at your own risk! 
If your system behaves erratically after applying some tweaks, please don't blame me. Remember to have a backup handy before starting to tune. Always make backup copies of the files you are changing. I tried carefully to assemble the information you are seeing here, aimed at improved system performance. As usual, there are no guarantees that what worked for me will work for you. Please don't take my recommendation at heart: They are starting points, not absolutes. Always read my reasoning, don't use them blindly.

Before you start, you ought to grab a copy of the TCP state transition diagram as specified in RFC 793 on page 23. The drawback is the missing error correction supplied by later RFCs. There is an easier way to obtain blowup printouts to staple to your office walls. Grab a copy of the PostScript file pocket guide, page 2 accompanying Stevens' TCP/IP Illustrated Volume 1 [4]. Or simply open the book at figure 18.12.

Please share your knowledge 
I try to assemble this page and related material for everybody interested in gaining more from her or his system. If you have an item I didn't cover, but which you deem worthwhile, please write to me. A few dozen or so regular readers of this page will thank you for it. I am only human, thus if you stumble over an error, misconception, or blatant nonsense, please have me correct it. In the past, there were quite a few mistakes.

The set of documents may look a trifle colorful, or just odd, if your browser supports cascading stylesheets. Care was taken to select the formatting tags in a way that the printed output still resembles the intentions of the author, and that the set of documents is still viewable with browser like Mosaic or Lynx. Stylesheets were used as an optical enhancement. Most notable is the different color of interior and external links. Interior links are shown in greenish colors, and will be rendered within the same frame. External links on the other hand are shown in bluish colors, and all will be shown in the same new frame. If you leave it open, a new external link will be shown within the same window. Literature references within the text are often interior links, pointing to the literature section, where the external links are located.

1.1 History
This page and the related work have a long history in gathering. I started out peeking wide eyed over the shoulders of two people from a search engine provider when they were installing the German server of a customer of my former employer. My only alternative resource of tuning information was the brilliant book TCP/IP Illustrated 1 [4] by Stevens. I started gathering all information about tuning I was able to get my hands upon. The cumulation of these you are experiencing on these pages.

1.2 Quick intro into ndd
Solaris allows you to tune, tweak, set and reset various parameters related to the TCP/IP stack while the system is running. Back in the SunOS 4.x days, one had to change various C files in the kernel source tree, generate a new kernel, reboot the machine and try out the changes. The Solaris feature of changing the important parameters on the fly is very convenient.

Many of the parameters I mention in the rest of the document you are reading are time intervals. All intervals are measured in milliseconds. Other parameters are usually bytecounts, but a few times different units of measurements are used and documented. A few items appear totally unrelated to TCP/IP, but due to the lack of a better framework, they materialized on this page.

Most tunings can be achieved using the program ndd. Any user may execute this program to read the current settings, depending on the readability of the respective device files. But only the super user is allowed to execute ndd -set to change values. This makes sense considering the sensitive parameters you are tuning. Details on the use of ndd can be obtained from the respective manual page.

ndd will become your friend, as it is the major tool to tweak most of the parameters described in this document. Therefore you better make yourself familiar with it. A quick overview will be given in this section, too. ndd is not limited to tweaking TCP/IP related parameters. Many other devices, which have a device file underneath /dev and a kernel module can be configured with the help of ndd. For instance, any networking driver which supports the Data Link Provider Interface (DLPI) can be configured.

The parameters supplied to ndd are symbolic keys indexing either a single usually numerically value, or a table. Please note that the keys usually (but not always) start out with the module or device name. For instance, changing values of the IP driver, you have to use the device file /dev/ip and all parameters start out with ip_. The question mark is the most notable exception to this rule.

1.2.1 Interactive mode
The interactive mode allows you to inspect and modify a device, driver or module interactively. In order to inspect the available keyword names associated with a parameter, just type the question mark. The next item will explain about the output format of the parameter list.

# ndd /dev/tcp
name to get/set ? tcp_slow_start_initial
value ? 
length ? 
2
name to get/set ? ^D
The example above queries the TCP driver for the value of the slow start feature in an interactive fashion. The typed input is shown boldface.

1.2.2 Show all available parameters
If you are interested in the parameters you can tweak for a given module, query for the question mark. This special parameter name is part of all ndd configurable material. It tells the names of all parameters available - including itself - and the access mode of the parameter.

# ndd /dev/icmp \?
?                             (read only)
icmp_wroff_extra              (read and write)
icmp_def_ttl                  (read and write)
icmp_bsd_compat               (read and write)
icmp_xmit_hiwat               (read and write)
icmp_xmit_lowat               (read and write)
icmp_recv_hiwat               (read and write)
icmp_max_buf                  (read and write)
Please mind that you have to escape the question mark with a backslash from the shell, if you are querying in the non-interactive fashion as shown above.

1.2.3 Query the value of one or more parameters (read access)
At the command line, you often need to check on settings of your TCP/IP stack or other parameters. By supplying the parameter name, you can examine the current setting. It is permissible to mention several parameters to check on at once.

 # ndd /dev/udp udp_smallest_anon_port
 32768
 # ndd /dev/hme link_status link_speed link_mode
 1

 1
 
 1
The first example checks on the smallest anonymous port UDP may use when sending a PDU. Please refer to the appropriate section later in this document on the recommended settings for this parameter.

The second example checks the three important link report values of a 100 Mbit ethernet interface. The results are separated by an empty line, because some parameters may refer to tabular values instead of a single number.

1.2.4 Modify the value of one parameter (write access)
This mode of interaction with ndd will frequently be found in scripts or when changing value at the command line in a non-interactive fashion. Please note that you may only set one value at a time. The scripts section below contains examples in how to make changes permanent using a startup script.

 # ndd -set /dev/ip ip_forwarding 0
The example will stop the forwarding of IP PDUs, even if more than one non-local interface is active and up. Of course, you can only change parameters which are marked for both, reading and writing.

1.2.5 Further remarks
Andres Kroonmaa kindly supplied a nifty script to check all existing values for a network component (tcp, udp, ip, icmp, etc.). Usually I do the same thing using a small Perl script.

1.3 How to read this document
This document is separated into several chapters with little inter-relation. It is still advisable to loosely follow the order outlined in the table of contents.

The first chapter entirely focusses on the TCP connection queues. It is quite long for such small topic, but it is also meant to introduce you into my style of writing. The next chapter deals with TCP retransmission related parameters that you can adjust to your needs. The chapter is more concise. One chapter on deals with path MTU discovery, as there used to be problems with older versions of Solaris. Recent versions usually do not need any adjustments.

The fifth chapter is a kind of catch-all. Some TCP, some UDP and some IP related parameters are explained (forwarding, port ranges, timers), and a quick detour into bug 1226653 explains that some versions were capable of sending packages larger than the MTU. The following chapter in depth deals with windows, buffers and related issues.

Chapter seven detours from the ndd interface, and focusses on variables you can set in your /etc/system file, as some things can only be thus managed. Another part of that chapter deals with the hme interface and appropriate tunables. The chapter may be split in future, and parts of it are already found in the appendices.

The chapter dealing with patches, an important topic with any OS, just points you to various sources, and only mentions some essential things for older versions of Solaris.

Literature exists in abundance. The literature sections is more a lose collection of links and some books that I consider essential when working with TCP/IP, not limited to Solaris. The RFC sections is kind of hard to keep up-to-date, but then, I reckon you know how to read the rfc-index file.

The final chapters quickly glance at new or at one time new versions of Solaris - time makes them obsolete. The chapter is there for historical reason, more or less. The scripts sections deals with the nettune script used by YaSSP. It finishes with some TODO material.

2. TCP connection initiation
This section is dedicated exclusively to the various queues and tunable variable(s) used during connection instantiation. The socket API maintains some control over the queues. But in order to tune anything, you have to understand how listen and accept interact with the queues. For details, see the various Stevens books mentioned in the literature section.

When the server calls listen, the kernel moves the socket from the TCP state CLOSED into the state LISTEN, thus doing a passive open. All TCP servers work like this. Also, the kernel creates and initializes various data structures, among them the socket buffers and two queues:

incomplete connection queue 
This queue contains an entry for every SYN that has arrived. BSD sources assign so_q0len entries to this queue. The server sends off the ACK of the client's SYN and the server side SYN. The connection get queued and the kernel now awaits the completion of the TCP three way handshake to open a connection. The socket is in the SYN_RCVD state. On the reception of the client's ACK to the server's SYN, the connection stays one round trip time (RTT) in this queue before the kernel moves the entry into the 

completed connection queue 
This queue contains an entry for each connection for which the three way handshake is completed. The socket is in the ESTABLISHED state. Each call to accept() removes the front entry of the queue. If there are no entries in the queue, the call to accept usually blocks. BSD source assign a length of so_qlen to this queue.

Both queues are limited regarding their number of entries. By calling listen(), the server is allowed to specify the size of the second queue for completed connections. If the server is for whatever reason unable to remove entries from the completed connection queue, the kernel is not supposed to queue any more connections. A timeout is associated with each received and queued SYN segment. If the server never receives an acknowledgment for a queued SYN segment, TCP state SYN_RCVD, the time will run out and the connection thrown away. The timeout is an important resistance against SYN flood attacks.

    
Figure 1: Queues maintained for listening sockets.   Figure 2: TCP three way handshake, connection initiation. 

Historically, the argument to the listen function specified the maximum number of entries for the sum of both queues. Many BSD derived implementations multiply the argument with a fudge factor of 3/2. Solaris <= 2.5.1 do not use the fudge factor, but adds 1, while Solaris 2.6 does use the fudge factor, though with a slightly different rounding mechanism than the one BSD uses. With a backlog argument of 14, Solaris 2.5.1 servers can queue 15 connections. Solaris 2.6 server can queue 22 connections.

Stevens shows that the incomplete connection queue does need more entries for busy servers than the completed connection queue. The only reason for specifying a large backlog value is to enable the incomplete connection queue to grow as SYN arrive from clients. Stevens shows that moderately busy webserver has an empty completed connection queue during 99 % of the time, but the incomplete connection queue needed 15 or less entries in 98 % of the time! Just try to imagine what this would mean for a really busy webcache like Squid.

Data for an established connection which arrives before the connection is accept()ed, should be stored into the socket buffer. If the queues are full when a SYN arrived, it is dropped in the hope that the client will resend it, hopefully finding room in the queues then.

According to Cockroft [2], there was only one listen queue for unpatched Solari <= 2.5.1. Solari >;= 2.6 or an applied TCP patch 103582-12 or above splits the single queue in the two shown in figure 1. The system administrator is allowed to tweak and tune the various maxima of the queue or queues with Solaris. Depending on whether there are one or two queues, there are different sets of tweakable parameters.

The old semantics contained just one tunable parameter tcp_conn_req_max which specified the maximum argument for the listen(). The patched versions and Solaris 2.6 replaced this parameter with the two new parameters tcp_conn_req_max_q0 and tcp_conn_req_max_q. A SunWorld article on 2.6 by Adrian Cockroft tells the following about the new parameters:

tcp_conn_req_max [is] replaced. This value is well-known as it normally needs to be increased for Web servers in older releases of Solaris 2. It no longer exists in Solaris 2.6, and patch 103582-12 adds this feature to Solaris 2.5.1. The change is part of a fix that prevents denial of service from SYN flood attacks. There are now two separate queues of partially complete connections instead of one.

tcp_conn_req_max_q0 is the maximum number of connections with handshake incomplete. A SYN flood attack could only affect this queue, and a special algorithm makes sure that valid connections can still get through.

tcp_conn_req_max_q is the maximum number of completed connections waiting to return from an accept call as soon as the right process gets some CPU time.

In other words, the first specifies the size of the incomplete connection queue while the second parameters assigns the maximum length of the completed connection queue. All three parameters are covered below.

You can determine if you need to tweak this set of parameters by watching the output of netstat -sP tcp. Look for the value of tcpListenDrop, if available on your version of Solaris. Older versions don't have this counter. Any value showing up might indicate something wrong with your server, but then, killing a busy server (like squid) shuts down its listening socket, and might increase this counter (and others). If you get many drops, you might need to increase the appropriate parameter. Since connections can also be dropped, because listen() specifies a too small argument, you have to be careful interpreting the counter value. On old versions, a SYN flood attack might also increase this counter.

Newer or patched versions of Solaris, with both queues available, will also have the additional counters tcpListenDropQ0 and tcpHalfOpenDrop. Now the original counter tcpListenDrop counts only connections dropped from the completed connection queue, and the counter ending in Q0 the drops from the incomplete connection queue. Killing a busy server application might increase either or both counters. If the tcpHalfOpenDrop shows up values, your server was likely to be the victim of a SYN flood. The counter is only incremented for dropping noxious connection attempts. I have no idea, if those will also show up in the Q0 counter, too.

tcp_conn_req_max 
default 8 (max. 32), since 2.5 32 (max. 1024), recommended 128 <= x <= 1024
since 2.6 or 2.5.1 with patches 103630-09 and 103582-12 or above applied:
see tcp_conn_req_max_q and tcp_conn_req_max_q0

The current parameter describes the maximum number of pending connection requests queued for a listening endpoint in the completed connection queue. The queue can only save the specified finite number of requests. If a queue overflows, nothing is sent back. The client will time out and (hopefully) retransmit.

The size of the completed connection queue does not influence the maximum number of simultaneous established connections after they were accepted nor does it have any influence on the maximum number of clients a server can serve. With Solaris, the maximum number of file descriptors is the limiting factor for simultaneous connections, which just happened to coincide with the maximum backlog queue size.

From the viewpoint of TCP those connections placed in the completed connection queue are in the TCP state ESTABLISHED, even though the application has not reaped the connection with a call to accept. That is the number limited by the size of the queue, which you tune with this parameter. If the application, for some reason, does not release entries from the queue by calling accept, the queue might overflow, and the connection is dropped. The client's TCP will hopefully retransmit, and might find a place in the queue.

Solaris offers the possibility to place connections into the backlog queue as soon as the first SYN arrives, called eager listening. The three way handshake will be completed as soon as the application accept()s the connection. The use of eager listening is not recommended for production systems.

Solari < 2.5 have a maximum queue length of 32 pending connections. The length of the completed connection queue can also be used to decrease the load on an overloaded server: If the queue is completely filled, remote clients will be denied further connections. Sometimes this will lead to a connection timed out error message.

Naively, I assumed that a very huge length might lead to a long service time on a loaded server. Stevens showed that the incomplete connection queue needs much more attention than the completed connection queue. But with tcp_conn_req_max you have no option to tweak that particular length.

Earlier versions of this document suggested to tune tcp_conn_req_max with regards to the values of rlim_fd_max and rlim_fd_cur, but the interdependencies are more complex than any rule of thumb. You have to find your own ideal. When a connection is still in the queue, only the queue length limits the number of entries. Connections taken from the queue are put into a file descriptor each.

There is a trick to overcome the hardcoded limit of 1024 with a patch. SunSolve shows this trick in connection with SYN flood attacks. A greatly increased listen backlog queue may offer some small increased protection against this vulnerability. On this topic also look at the tcp_ip_abort_cinterval parameter. Better, use the mentioned TCP patches, and increase the q0 length.

echo "tcp_param_arr+14/W 0t10240" | adb -kw /dev/ksyms /dev/mem
This patch is only effective on the currently active kernel, limiting its extend to the next boot. Usually you want to append the line above on the startup script /etc/init.d/inetinit. The shown patch increases hard limit of the listen backlog queue to 10240. Only after applying this patch you may use values above 1024 for the tcp_conn_req_max parameter.

A further warning: Changes to the value of tcp_conn_req_max parameter in a running system will not take effect until each listening application is restarted. The backlog queue length is evaluated whenever an application calls listen(3N), usually once during startup. Sending a HUP signal may or may not work; personally I prefer to TERM the application and restart them manually or, even better, use a startup script.

tcp_conn_req_max_q0 
since 2.5.1 with patches 103630-09 and 103582-12 or above applied: default 1024;
since 2.6: default 1024, recommended 1024 <= x <= 10240

After installing the mentioned TCP patches, alternatively after installing Solaris 2.6, the parameter tcp_conn_req_max is no longer available. In its stead the new parameters tcp_conn_req_max_q and tcp_conn_req_max_q0 emerged. tcp_conn_req_max_q0 is the maximum number of connections with handshake incomplete, basically the length of the incomplete connection queue.

In other words, the connections in this queue are just being instantiated. A SYN was just received from the client, thus the connection is in the TCP SYN_RCVD state. The connection cannot be accept()ed until the handshake is complete, even if the eager listening is active.

To protect against SYN flooding, you can increase this parameter. Also refer to the parameter tcp_conn_req_max_q above. I believe that changes won't take effect unless the applications are restarted.

tcp_conn_req_max_q 
since 2.5.1 with patches 103630-09 and 103582-12 or above applied: default 128;
since 2.6: default 128, recommended 128 <= x <= tcp_conn_req_max_q0

After installing the mentioned TCP patches, alternatively after installing Solaris 2.6, the parameter tcp_conn_req_max is no longer available. In its stead the new parameters tcp_conn_req_max_q and tcp_conn_req_max_q0 emerged. tcp_conn_req_max_q is the length of the completed connection queue.

In other words, connections in this queue of length tcp_conn_req_max_q have completed the three way handshake of a TCP open. The connection is in the state ESTABLISHED. Connections in this queue have not been accept()ed by the server process (yet).

Also refer to the parameter tcp_conn_req_max_q0. Remember that changes won't take effect unless the applications are restarted.

tcp_conn_req_min 
Since 2.6: default 1, recommended: don't touch

This parameter specifies the minimum number of available connections in the completed connection queue for select() or poll() to return "readable" for a listening (server) socket descriptor.

Programmers should note that Stevens [7] describes a timing problem, if the connection is RST between the select() or poll() call and the subsequent accept() call. If the listening socket is blocking, the default for sockets, it will block in accept() until a valid connection is received. While this seems no tragedy with a webserver or cache receiving several connection requests per second, the application is not free to do other things in the meantime, which might constitute a problem.

3. Retransmission related parameters
The retransmission timeout values used by Solaris are way too aggressive for wide area networks, although they can be considered appropriate for local area networks. SUN thus did not follow the suggestions mentioned in RFC 1122. Newer releases of the Solaris kernel are correcting the values in question:

The recommended upper and lower bounds on the RTO are known to be inadequate on large internets. The lower bound SHOULD be measured in fractions of a second (to accommodate high speed LANs) and the upper bound should be 2*MSL, i.e., 240 seconds. 
Besides the retransmit timeout (RTO) value two further parameters R1 and R2 may be of interest. These don't seem to be tunable via any Solaris' offered interface that I know of.

The value of R1 SHOULD correspond to at least 3 retransmissions, at the current RTO. The value of R2 SHOULD correspond to at least 100 seconds.

[...]

However, the values of R1 and R2 may be different for SYN and data segments. In particular, R2 for a SYN segment MUST be set large enough to provide retransmission of the segment for at least 3 minutes. The application can close the connection (i.e., give up on the open attempt) sooner, of course.

Great many internet servers which are running Solaris do retransmit segments unnecessarily often. The current condition of European networks indicate that a connection to the US may take up to 2 seconds. All parameters mentioned in the first part of this section relate to each other!

As a starter take this little example. Consider a picture, size 1440 byte, LZW compressed, which is to be transferred over a serial linkup with 14400 bps and using a MTU of 1500. In the ideal case only one PDU gets transmitted. The ACK segment can only be sent after the complete PDU is received. The transmission takes about 1 second. These values seem low, but they are meant as 'food for thought'. Now consider something going awry...

Solaris 2.5.1 is behaving strange, if the initial SYN segment from the host doing the active open is lost. The initial SYN gets retransmitted only after a period of 4 * tcp_rexmit_interval_initial plus a constant C. The time is 12 seconds with the default settings. More information is being prepared on the retransmission test page.

The initial lost SYN may or may not be of importance in your environment. For instance, if you are connected via ATM SVCs, the initial PDU might initiate a logical connection (ATM works point to point) in less than 0.3 seconds, but will still be lost in the process. It is rather annoying for a user of 2.5.1 to wait 12 seconds until something happens.

tcp_rexmit_interval_initial 
default 500, since 2.5.1 3000, recommended >;= 2000 (500 for special purposes)

This interval is waited before the last data sent is retransmitted due to a missing acknowledgment. Mind that this interval is used only for the first retransmission. The more international your server is, the larger you should chose this interval.

Special laboratory environments working in LAN-only environments might be better off with 500 ms or even less. If you are doing measurements involving TCP (which is almost always a bad idea), you should consider lowering this parameter.

Why do I consider TCP measurements a bad idea? If ad-hoc approaches are used, or there is no deeper knowledge of the mechanics of TCP, you are bound to arrive at wrong conclusions. Unless there are TCP dumps to document that indeed what you expect is actually happening, results may lead to wrong conclusions. If done properly, there is nothing wrong with TCP measurements. The same rules apply, if you are measuring protocols on top of TCP.

There are lots of knobs and dials to be fiddled with - all of which need to be documented along with the results. Scientific experiments need to be repeatable by others in order to verify your findings.

tcp_rexmit_interval_min 
default 200, recommended >;= 1000 (200 for special purposes)
Since 8: default 400

After the initial retransmission further retransmissions will start after the tcp_rexmit_interval_min interval. BSD usually specifies 1500 milliseconds. This interval should be tuned to the value of tcp_rexmit_interval_initial, e.g. some value between 50 % up to 200 %. The parameter has no effect on retransmissions during an active open, see my accompanying document on retransmissions.

The tcp_rexmit_interval_min doesn't display any influence on connection establishment with Solaris 2.5.1. It does with 2.6, though. The influence on regular data retransmissions, or FIN retransmissions I have yet to research.

tcp_ip_abort_interval 
default 120000, since 2.5 480000, recommended 600000
This interval specifies how long retransmissions for a connection in the ESTABLISHED state should be tried before a RESET segment is sent. BSD systems default to 9 minutes.

You don't want your connections to fail too quickly once they are in the ESTABLISHED state. A reader reported that Veritas backup clients might fail with "socket write failed". Veritas recommends not to set above parameter below 8 minutes.


tcp_ip_abort_linterval 
default ?, recommended ?

According to an unconfirmed user report, the parameter is the abort interval for passive connections, i.e. those received on ports in the LISTEN state. Refer to the tcp_ip_abort_cinterval for details, as there is some confusion between what SunSolve says and what can be read in Stevens.

tcp_ip_abort_cinterval 
default 240000, since 2.5 180000, recommended ?

This interval specifies how long retransmissions for a remote host are repeated until the RESET segment is sent. The difference to the tcp_ip_abort_interval parameter is that this connection is about to be established - it has not yet reached the state ESTABLISHED. This value is interesting considering SYN flood attacks on your server. Proxy server are doubly handicapped because of their Janus behavior (like a server towards the downstream cache, like a client towards the upstream server).

According to Stevens this interval is connected to the active open, e.g. the connect(3N) call. But according to SunSolve the interval has an impetus on both directions. A remote client can refuse to acknowledge an opening connection up to this interval. After the interval a RESET is sent. The other way around works out, too. If the three-way handshake to open a connection is not finished within this interval, the RESET Segment will be sent. This can only happen, if the final ACK went astray, which is a difficult test case to simulate.

To improve your SYN flood resistance, SUN suggests to use an interval as small as 10000 milliseconds. This value has only been tested for the "fast" networks of SUN. The more international your connection is, the slower it will be, and the more time you should grant in this interval. Proxy server should never lower this value (and should let Squid terminate the connection). Webservers are usually not affected, as they seldom actively open connections beyond the LAN.

tcp_rexmit_interval_max 
default 60000, RFC 1122 recommends 240000 (2MSL), recommended 1...2 * tcp_close_wait_interval or tcp_time_wait_interval
Since 2.6: default 240000
Since 8: default 60000

All previously mentioned retransmissions related interval use an exponential backoff algorithm. The wait interval between two consecutive retransmissions for the same PDU is doubled starting with the minimum.

The tcp_rexmit_interval_max interval specifies the maximum wait interval between two retransmissions. If changing this value, you should also give the abort interval an inspection. The maximum wait interval should only be reached shortly before the abort interval timer expires. Additionally, you should coordinate your interval with the value of tcp_close_wait_interval or tcp_time_wait_interval.

tcp_deferred_ack_interval 
default 50, BSD 200, recommended 200 (regular), 50 (benchmarking), or 500 (WAN server)
Since 8: default 100

This parameter specifies the timeout before sending a delayed ACK. The value should not be increased above 500, as required by RFC 1122. This value is of great interest for interactive services. A small number will increase the "responsiveness" of a remote service (telnet, X11), while a larger value can decrease the number of segments exchanged.

The parameter might also interest to HTTP servers which transmit small amounts of data after a very short retrieval time. With a heavy-duty servers or in laboratory banging environment, you might encounter service times answering a request which are well above 50 ms. An increase to 500 might lead to less PDUs transferred over the network, because TCP is able to merge the ACK with data. Increases beyond 500 should not be even considered.

SUN claims that Solaris recognizes the initial data phase of a connection. An initial ACK (not SYN) is not delayed. As opposed to the simplistic approach mentioned in the SUN paper, a request for a webservice (both, server or proxy) which does not fit into a single PDU can be transmitted faster. Also check the tcp_slow_start_initial Parameter.

The tcp_deferred_ack_interval also seems to be used to distinguish full-sized segments between interactive traffic and bulk data transfer. If a sender uses MSS sized segments, but sends each segment further apart than approximately 0.9 times the interval, the traffic will be rated interactive, and thus every segment seems to get ACKed.


tcp_deferred_acks_max 
Since 2.6: default 8, recommended ?, maximum 16

This parameter features the maximum number of segments received after which an ACK just has to be sent. Previously I thought this parameter solely related to interactive data transfer, but I was mistaken. This parameter specifies the number of outstanding ACKs. You can give it a look when tuning for high speed traffic and bulk transfer, but the parameter is controversial. For instance, unless you employ selective acknowledgments (SACK) like Solaris 7, you can only ACK the number of segments correctly received. With the parameter at a larger value, statistically the amount of data to retransmit is larger.

Good values for retransmission tuning don't beam into existence from a white source. Rather you should carefully plan an experiment to get decent values. Intervals from another site can not be carried over to another Solaris system without change. But they might give you an idea where to start when choosing your own values.

The next part looks at a few parameters having to do with retransmissions, as well.

tcp_slow_start_initial 
Since 2.5.1 with patch 103582-15 applied: default 1
Since 2.6: default 1, recommended 2 or 4 for servers
Since 8: default 4, no recommendations

This parameter provides the slow-start bug discovered in BSD and Windows TCP/IP implementations for Solaris. More information on the topic can be found on the servers of SUN and in Stevens [6]. To summarize the effect, a server starts sending two PDUs at once without waiting for an ACK due to wrong ACK counts. The ACK from connection initiation being counted as data ACK - compare with figure 2. Network congestion avoidance algorithms are being undermined. The slow start algorithm does not allow the buggy behavior, compare with RFC 2001.

Setting the parameter to 2 allows a Solaris machine to behave like it has the slow start bug, too. Well, IETF is said to make amends to the slow start algorithm, and the bug is now actively turned into a feature. SUN also warns:

It's still conceivable, although rare, that on a configuration that supports many clients on very slow-links, the change might induce more network congestions. Therefore the change of tcp_slow_start_initial should be made with caution.

[...]

Future Solaris releases are likely to default to 2.

You can also gain performance, if many of your clients are running old BSD or derived TCP/IP stacks (like MS). I expect new BSD OS releases not to figure this bug, but then I am not familiar with the BSD OS family. A reader of this page told me about cutting the latency of his server in half, just by using the value of 2.

If you want to know more about this feature and its behavior, you can have a look at some experiments I have conducted concerning that particular feature. The summary is that I agree with the reader: A BSDish client like Windows definitely profits from using a value of 2.

tcp_slow_start_after_idle 
Since 2.6: default 2, no recommendations
Since 8: default 4, no recommendations

I reckon that this parameter deals with the slow start for an already established connection which was idle for some time (however the term idle is defined here).

tcp_dupack_fast_retransmit 
default 3, no recommendations

Something to do with the number of duplicates ACKs. If we do fast retransmit and fast recovery algorithms, this many ACKs must be retransmitted until we assume that a segment has really been lost. A simple reordering of segments usually causes no more than two duplicate ACKs.

There are a couple of parameters which require some elementary familiarity with RFC 2001, which covers TCP Slow Start, Congestion Avoidance, Fast Retransmit, and Fast Recovery Algorithms, as well as ssthresh and cwnd.

tcp_rtt_updates 
default 0, BSD 16, recommended: (see text)
Since 8: 20, no recommendations

This parameter controls when things like rtt_sa (the smoothed RTT), rtt_sd (the smoothed mean deviation), and ssthresh (the slow start threshold) are cached in the routing table. By default, Solaris does not cache any of the parameters. It is claimed that you can set it to a value you like, but to be the same as BSD, use 16.

The value to this parameter is the number of RTT samples that had to be sampled, so that an accurate enough value can be stored in the routing table. If you chose to use this feature, use a value of 16 or above. Using 16 allows the smoothed RTT filter to converge within 5 % of the correct value, compare Stevens [4], chapter 21.9.

ip_ire_cleanup_interval 
default 30000, no recommendatations
Since 8: the parameter has a new name: ip_ire_arp_interval

The parameters may do more than described here. If a routing table entry is not directly connected and not being used, the cache for things like rtt_sa, rtt_sd and ssthresh associated with the entry will be flushed after 30 seconds. The parameter tcp_rtt_updates must be greater than zero to enable the cache.

I could imagine that external helper programs invoked by MRTG on a regular basis connecting to a far-away host might benefit from increasing this value slightly above the invocation interval.

4. path MTU discovery
Whenever a connection is about to be established, the three-way handshake open negotiation, the segment size used will be set to the minimum of (a) the smallest MTU of an outgoing interface, and (b) from MSS announced by the peer. If the remote peer does not announce a MSS, usually the value 536 will be assumed. If path MTU discovery is active, all outgoing PDUs have the IP option DF (don't fragment) set.

If the ICMP error message fragmentation needed is received, a router on the way to the destination needed to fragment the PDU, but was not allowed to do so. Therefore the router discarded the PDU and did send back the ICMP error. Newer router implementations enclose the needed MSS in the error message. If the needed MSS is not included, the correct MSS must be determined by trial and error algorithm.

Due to the internet being a packet switching network, the route a PDU travels along a TCP virtual circuit may change with time. For this reason RFC 1191 recommends to rediscover the path MTU of an active connection after 10 minutes. Improvements of the route can only be noticed by repeated rediscoveries. Unfortunately, Solaris aggressively tries to rediscover the path MTU every 30 seconds. While this is o.k. for LAN environments, it is a grossly impolite behavior in WANs. Since routes may not change that often, aggressive repetitions of path MTU discoveries leads to unnecessary consumption of channel capacity and elongated service times.

Path MTU discovery is a far reaching and controversial topic when discussing it with local ISPs. Still, pMTU discovery is at the foundation of IPv6. The PSC tuning page argues pro path MTU discovery, especially if you maintain a high-speed or long-delay (e.g. satellite) link.

The recommendation I can give you is not to use the defaults of Solaris < 2.5. Please use path MTU discovery, but tune your system RFC conformant. You may alternatively want to switch off the path MTU discovery all together, though there are few situations where this is necessary.

I was made aware of the fact that in certain circumstances bridges connecting data link layers of differing MTU sizes defeat pMTU discovery. I have to put some more investigation into this matter. If a frame with maximum MTU size is to be transported into the network with the smaller MTU size, it is truncated silently. A bridge does not know anything about the upper protocol levels: A bridge neither fragments IP nor sends an ICMP error.

There may be work-arounds, and the tcp_mss_def is one of them. Setting all interfaces to the minimum shared MTU might help, at the cost of losing performance on the larger MTU network. Using what RFC 1122 calls an IP gateway is a possible, yet expensive solution.

ip_ire_pathmtu_interval 
default 30000, recommended 600000
Since 2.5 600000, no recommendations

This timer determines the interval Solaris rediscovers the path MTU. An extremely large value will only evaluate the path MTU once at connection establishment.

ip_path_mtu_discovery 
default 1, recommended 1

This parameter switches path MTU discovery on or off. If you enter a 0 here, Solaris will never try to set the DF bit in the IP option - unless your application explicitly requests it.

tcp_ignore_path_mtu 
default 0, recommended 0

This is a debug switch! When activated, this switch will have the IP or TCP layer ignore all ICMP error messages fragmentation needed. By this, you will achieve the opposite of what you intended.

tcp_mss_def 
default 536, recommended >;= 536
Since 8: split into tcp_mss_def_ipv4 and tcp_mss_def_ipv6

This parameter determines the default MSS (maximum segment size) for non-local destination. For path MTU discovery to work effectively, this value can be set to the MTU of the most-used outgoing interface descreased by 20 byte IP header and 20 byte TCP header - if and only if the value is bigger than 536.

tcp_mss_def_ipv4 
Since 8: default 536 
tcp_mss_def_ipv6 
Since 8: default 1460

Solaris 8 supports IPv6. Since IPv6 uses different defaults for the maximum segment size, one has to distinguish between IPv4 and IPv6. The default for IPv6 is close to what is said for tcp_mss_def.

tcp_mss_min 
default 1, see text, (88 in Linux 2.4 and Win2k)
Since 8 with patch 108528-14 or above: 108

This parameter defines the minimum for the maximum segment size. While I still ponder the implications of increasing this parameter, some people tell me that a minimum of 108, especially in an NFS environment, is favorable. It might also have security implications on the TCP MSS handshake during connection initiation: A malicious host can announce a MSS that is below any sensible value, and this parameter might protect your host by enforcing a sensible minimum.

Unfortunately, currently I don't have a host to test this.

5. Further advice, hints and remarks
This section covers a variety of topics, starting with various TCP timers which do not relate to previously mentioned issues. The next subsection throws a quick glance at some erratic behavior. The final section looks at a variety of parameters which deal with the reservation of resources.

Additionally, I strongly suggest the use of a file /etc/init.d/nettune (always called first script) which changes the tunable parameters. /etc/rcS.d/S31nettune is a hardlink to this file. The script will be executed during bootup when the system is in single user mode. A killscript is not necessary. The section about startup scripts below reiterates this topic in greater depth.

5.1 Common TCP timers
The current subsection covers three important TCP timers. First I will have a look at the keepalive timer. The timer is rather controversial, and some Solari implement them incorrectly. The next parameter limits the twice maximum segment lifetime (2MSL) value, which is connected to the time a socket spends in the TCP state TIME_WAIT. The final entry looks at the time spend in the TCP state FIN_WAIT_2.

tcp_keepalive_interval 
default 7200000, minimum 10000, recommended 10000 <= x <= oo

This value is one of the most controversial ones when talking with other people about appropriate values. The interval specified with this key must expire before a keep-alive probe can be sent. Keep-alive probes are described in the host requirements RFC 1122: If a host chooses to implement keep-alive probes, it must enable the application to switch them on or off for a connection, and keep-alive probes must be switched off by default.

Keep-alives can terminate a perfectly good connection (as far as TCP/IP is concerned), cost your money and use up transmission capacity (commonly called bandwidth, which is, actually, something completely different). Determining whether a peer is alive should be a task of the application and thus kept on the application layer. Only if you run into the danger of keeping a server in the ESTABLISHED state forever, and thus using up precious server resources, you should switch on keep-alive probes.


Figure 3: A typical handshake during a transaction. 

Figure 3 shows the typical handshake during a HTTP connection. It is of no importance for the argumentation if the server is threaded, preforked or just plain forked. Webservers work transaction oriented as is shown in the following simplified description - the numbers do not relate to the figure:

The client (browser) initiates a connection (active open). 
The client forwards its query (request). 
The server (daemon) answers (response). 
The server terminates the connection (active close). 

Common implementations need to exchange 9..10 TCP segments per HTTP connection. The keep-alive option as a HTTP/1.0 protocol and extensions can be regarded as a hack. Persistent connections are a different matter, and not shown here. Most people still use HTTP/1.0, especially the Squid users.

The keep-alive timer becomes significant for webservers, if in step 1 the client crashed or terminates without the server knowing about it. This condition can be forced sometimes by quickly pressing the stop button of netscape or the Logo of Mosaic. Thus the keep-alive probes do make sense for webservers. HTTP Proxies look like a server to the browser, but look like a client to the server they are querying. Due to their server like interface, the conditions for webservers are true for proxies, as well.

With an implementation of keep-alive probes working correctly, a very small value can make sense when trying to improve webservers. In this case you have to make sure that the probes stop after a finite time, if a peer does not answer. Solari <= 2.5 have a bug and send keep-alive probes forever. They seem to want to elicit some response, like a RST or some ICMP error message from an intermediate router, but never counted on the destination simply being down. Is this fixed with 2.5.1? Is there a patch available against this misbehavior? I don't know, maybe you can help me.

I am quite sure that this bug is fixed in 2.6 and that it is safe to use a small value like ten minutes. Squid users should synchronize their cache configuration accordingly. There are some Squid timeouts dealing with an idle connection.

tcp_close_wait_interval 
default 240000 (according to RFC 1122, 2MSL), recommended 60000, possibly lower
Since 7: obsoleted parameter, use tcp_time_wait_interval instead
Since 8: no more access, use tcp_time_wait_interval

Even though the parameter key contains "close_wait" in its name, the value specifies the TIME_WAIT interval! In order to fix this kind of confusion, starting with Solaris 7, the parameter tcp_close_wait_interval was renamed to the correct name tcp_time_wait_interval. The old key tcp_close_wait_interval still exists for backward compatibility reasons. User of Solari below 7 must use the old name tcp_close_wait_interval. Still, refer to tcp_time_wait_interval for an in-depth explaination.

tcp_time_wait_interval 
Since 7: default 240000 (2MSL according to RFC 1122), recommended 60000, possibly lower

As Stevens repeatedly states in his books, the TIME_WAIT state is your friend. You should not desperately try to avoid it, rather try to understand it. The maximum segment lifetime(MSL) is the maximum interval a TCP segment may live in the net. Thus waiting twice this interval ensures that there are no leftover segments coming to haunt you. This is what the 2MSL is about. Afterwards it is safe to reuse the socket resource.

The parameter specifies the 2MSL according to the four minute limit specified in RFC 1122. With the knowledge about current network topologies and the strategies to reserve ephemeral ports you should consider a shorter interval. The shorter the interval, the faster precious resources like ephemeral ports are available again.

A toplevel search engine implementor recommends a value of 1000 millisecond to its customers. Personally I believe this is too low for regular server. A loaded search engine is a different matter alltogether, but now you see where some people start tweaking their systems. I rather tend to use a multiple of the tcp_rexmit_interval_initial interval. The current value of tcp_rexmit_interval_max should also be considered in this case - even though retransmissions are unconnected to the 2MSL time. A good starting point might be the double RTT to a very remote system (e.g. Australia for European sites). Alternatively a German commercial provider of my acquaintance uses 30000, the smallest interval recommended by BSD.

tcp_fin_wait_2_flush_interval 
BSD 675000, default 675000, recommended 67500 (one zero less)

This values seems to describe the (BSD) timer interval which prohibits a connection to stay in the FIN_WAIT_2 state forever. FIN_WAIT_2 is reached, if a connection closes actively. The FIN is acknowledged, but the FIN from the passive side didn't arrive yet - and maybe never will.

Usually webservers and proxies actively close connections - as long as you don't use persistent connection and even those are closed from time to time. Apart from that HTTP/1.0 compliant server and proxies close connections after each transaction. A crashed or misbehaving browser may cause a server to use up a precious resource for a long time.

You should consider decreasing this interval, if netstat -f inet shows many connections in the state FIN_WAIT_2. The timer is only used, if the connection is really idle. Mind that after a TCP half close a simplex data transmission is still available towards the actively closing end. TCP half closes are not yet supported by Squid, though many web servers do support them (certain HTTP drafts suggest an independent use of TCP connections). Nevertheless, as long as the client sends data after the server actively half closed an established connection the timer is not active.

Sometimes, a Squid running on Solaris (2.5.1) confuses the system utterly. A great number of connection to a varying degree are in CLOSE_WAIT for reasons beyond me. During this phase the proxy is virtually unreachable for HTTP requests though, obnoxiously, it still answers ICP requests. Although lowering the value for tcp_close_wait_interval is only fixing symptoms indirectly, not the cause, it may help overcoming those periods of erratic behavior faster than the default. The thing needed would be some means to influence the CLOSE_WAIT interval directly.

5.2 Erratic IPX behavior.
I noticed that Solari < 2.6 behave erratically under some conditions, if the IPX ethernet MTU of 1500 is used. Maybe there is an error in the frame assembly algorithm. If you limit yourself to the IEEE 802.3 MTU of 1492 byte, the problem does not seem to appear. A sample startup script with link in /etc/rc2.d can be used to change the MTU of ethernet interfaces after their initialization. Remember to set the MTU for every virtual interface, too!

Note, with a patched Solaris 2.5.1 or Solaris 2.6, the problem does not seem to appear. Limiting your MTU to non-standard might introduce problems with truncated PDUs in certain (admittedly very special) environments. Thus you may want to refrain from using the above mentioned script (always called second script in this document).

Since I observed the erratic behavior only in a Solaris 2.5, I believe it has been fixed with patch 103169-10, or above. The error description reads "1226653 IP can send packets larger than MTU size to the driver."


5.3 Common IP parameters
The following parameters have little impact on performance, nevertheless I reckon them worth noting here. Please note that parameters starting with the ip6 prefix apply to IPv6 while its twin with the ip applies to IPv4:

ip6_forwarding 
Since 8: default 1, recommended 0 for pure server hosts or security 
ip_forwarding 
default 2, recommended 0 for pure server hosts or security
Since 8: default 1, recommended 0 for security reasons

If you intend to disable the routing abilities of your host all together, because you know you don't need them, you can set this switch to 0. The default value of 2 was only available in older versions of Solaris. It activates IP forwarding, if two or more real interfaces are up. The value of 1 in Solari < 8 activates IP forwarding regardless of the number of interfaces. With the possible exception of MBone routers and firewalling, you should leave routing to the dedicated routing hardware.

Starting with Solaris 8, the parameter set is split. You use ip_forwarding and ip6_forwarding to overall switch on forwarding of IPv4 and IPv6 PDU respectively between interfaces. The interfaces participating in forwarding can be activated separately, see if:ip_forwarding. Unless you host is acting as router, it is still recommended for security reasons to switch off any forwarding between interfaces.

if:ip_forwarding 
Since 8: default 0, maximum 1, recommended 0

Please replace the if part of the parameter name with the appropriate interface available on your system, e.g. hme0 or hme0. Look into the available /dev/ip parameters, if unsure what interfaces are known to the IP stack.

Starting with Solaris 8, a subset of interfaces participating in IP forwarding can be selected by setting the appropriate parameter to 1. You also need to set the ip6_forwarding and ip_forwarding parameter, if you want to forward IPv6 or IPv6 respectively.

For security reasons, and in many environments, forwarding is not recommended.

ip6_forward_src_routed 
Since 8: default 1, recommended 0 for security reasons 
ip_forward_src_routed 
default 1, recommended 0 for security reasons

This parameter determines if IP datagrams can be forwarded which have the source routing option activated. The parameter has little meaning for performance but is rather of security relevance. Solaris may forward such datagrams, if the host route option is activated, bypassing certain security construct - possibly undermining your firewall. Thus you should disable it always, unless the host functions as a regular router (and no other services).

If you enabled IPv6 forwarding or IPv4 forwarding, the *_forward_src_routed parameters may relate to forwarding.

ip_forward_directed_broadcasts 
default 1, recommended 0 for pure server hosts or security

This switch decides whether datagrams directed to any of your direct broadcast addresses can be forwarded as link-layer broadcasts. If the switch is on (default), such datagrams are forwarded. If set to zero, pings or other broadcasts to the broadcast address(es) of your installed interface(s) are silently discarded. The switch is recommended for any host, but can break "expected" behavior.

ip6_respond_to_echo_multicast 
Since 8: default 1, recommended 0 for security reasons 
ip_respond_to_echo_broadcast 
default 1, recommended 0 for security reasons

If you don't want to respond to an ICMP echo request (usually generated by the ping program) to any of your IPv4 broadcast or IPv6 multicast addresses addresses, set the matching parameter to 0. On one hand, responding to broadcast pings is rumored to have caused panics, or at least partial network meltdowns. On the other hand, it is a valid behavior, and often used to determine the number of alive hosts on a particular network. If you are dead sure that neither you nor your network admin will need this feature, you can switch it off by using the value of 0.

If you do not want to respond to any IPv4-broadcast or IPv6-multicast probes for security reasons, it is recommended to set the matching parameter to 0.

ip_icmp_err_burst 
Since 8: default 10, min 1, maximum 99999, see text

ip_icmp_err_interval 
default 500, recommended: see text

Solaris IP only generates ip_icmp_err_burst ICMP error messages in any ip_icmp_err_interval, regardless of IPv4 or IPv6. In order to protect from denial of service (DOS) attacks, the parameters do not need to be changed. Some administrators may need a higher error generation rate, and thus may want to decrease the interval or increase the generated message.

In versions of Solaris prior to 8, ip_icmp_err_interval used to define the minimum time between two consecutive ICMP error responses - as if in older versions the (by then not existing) ip_icmp_err_burst parameter had a value of 1. The generated ICMP responses include the time exceeded message as evoked by the traceroute command. If your current setting here is above the RTT of a traceroute probe, usually the second probe you see will time out.

If you set ip_icmp_err_burst to exactly 0, traceroute will not give away your host as running Solaris. Also, you switched of the rate limitation of ICMP messages, and are thus open to DOS attacks. Of course, there are other ways to determine which TCP/IP implementation a networked host is running.

ip6_icmp_return_data_bytes 
Since 8: default 64, minimum 8, maximum 65520, no recommendations

ip_icmp_return_data_bytes 
default 64, minimum 8, maximum 65520, no recommendations

The parameters control the number of bytes returned by any ICMP error message generated on this Solaris host. The default value 64 is sufficient for most cases. Some laboratory environments may want to temporarily increase the value in order to figure out problems with some network services.

ip6_send_redirects 
Since 8: default 1, recommendation 0 for security reasons 
ip_send_redirects 
default 1, recommendation 0 for security reasons

These parameters control whether the IPv4 or IPv6 part of the IP stack send ICMP redirect messages. For security reasons, it is recommended to disable sending out such messages, unless your host is acting as router.

If you enabled IPv6 forwarding or IPv4 forwarding, the *_send_redirects parameters may relate to forwarding.

ip6_ignore_redirect 
Since 8: default 0, recommendation 1 for security reasons 
ip_ignore_redirect 
default 0, recommendation 1 for security reasons

This flag control, if your routing table can be updated by ICMP redirect messages. Unless you run your host to act as router, it is recommended to disable this feature for security reasons. Otherwise, malicious external hosts may confuse your routing table.

If you enabled IPv6 forwarding or IPv4 forwarding, the *_ignore_redirects parameters may relate to forwarding.

ip_addrs_per_if 
default 256, minimum 1, maximum 8192, no recommendations

This parameter limits the number of virtual interfaces you can declare per physical interface. Especially if you run Web Polygraph, you will need to increase the number of virtual interfaces available on your system.

ip6_strict_dst_multihoming 
Since 8: default 0, recommended: see text 
ip_strict_dst_multihoming 
default 0, recommended: see text

According to RFC 1122, a host is said to be multihomed, if it has more than one IP address. Each IP address is assumed to be a logical interface. Different logical interfaces may map to the same physical interface. Physical interfaces may be connected to the same or different networks.

The strong end system model aka strict multihoming requires a host not to accept datagrams on physical interfaces to which to logical one is not bound. Outgoing datagrams are restricted to the interface which corresponds with the source ip address.

The weak end system model aka loose multihoming lets a host accept any of its ip addresses on any of its interfaces. Outgoing datagrams may be sent on any interface.

For security reasons, it is recommended to require strict multihoming, that is, setting the parameter to value 1. In certain circumstances, though, it may be necessary to disable strict multihoming, e.g. if the host is connected to a virtual private networks (VPN) or sometimes when acting as firewall.

For instance, I once maintained a setup, where a pair of related caching proxies were talking exclusively to each other via a crossover cable on one interface using private addresses while the other interface was connected to the public internet. In order to have them actually use the behind-the-scenes link, I had to manually set routes and disable strict multihoming.

5.4 TCP and UDP port related parameters
There are some parameters related to the ranges of ports associated with reserved access and non-privileged access. This section deals with the majority of useful parameters when selecting different than default port ranges.

udp_smallest_anon_port 
tcp_smallest_anon_port 
default 32768, recommended 8192

This value has the same size for UDP and TCP. Solaris allocates ephemeral ports above 32768. Busy servers or hosts using a large 2MSL, see tcp_close_wait_interval, may want to lower this limit to 8192. This yields more precious resources, especially for proxy servers.

A contra-indication may be servers and services running on well known ports above 8192. This parameter should be set very early during system bootup, especially before the portmapper is started.

The IANA port numbers document requires the assigned and/or private ports to start at 49152. For busy servers, severly limiting their ephemeral port supply in such a manner is not an option.

udp_largest_anon_port 
default 65535, recommended: see text

This parameter has to be seen in combination with udp_smallest_anon_port. The traceroute program tries to reach a random UDP port above 32768 - or rather tries not to reach such a port - in order to provoke an ICMP error message from the host.

Paranoid system administrator may want to lower the value for this reason down to 32767, after the corresponding value for udp_smallest_anon_port has been lowered. On the other hand, datagram application protocols should be able to cope with foreign protocol datagrams.

If an ICP caching proxy or other UDP hyper-active applications are used, the lowering of this value can not be recommended. The respective TCP parameter tcp_largest_anon_port does not suffer this problem.

tcp_largest_anon_port 
default 65535, no recommendations

The largest anonymous port for TCP should be the largest possible port number. There is no need to change this parameter.

udp_smallest_nonpriv_port 
default 1024, no recommendations 
tcp_smallest_nonpriv_port 
defau

来自 “ ITPUB博客 ” ,链接:http://blog.itpub.net/768134/viewspace-695393/,如需转载,请注明出处,否则将追究法律责任。

上一篇: solaris的snoop指令
请登录后发表评论 登录
全部评论

注册时间:2018-11-04

  • 博文量
    35
  • 访问量
    27012