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嵌入式Linux基础教程(第2版):英文版

原创 Linux操作系统 作者:china-pub-pb 时间:2012-02-15 16:00:08 0 删除 编辑
嵌入式Linux基础教程(第2版):英文版

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  全面剖析嵌入式Linux开发,揭示大量技术内幕

基本信息

http://product.china-pub.com/194677

内容简介

  《嵌入式linux基础教程》是嵌入式linux 的经典教程,介绍了引导装入程序、系统初始化、文件系统、闪存和内核、应用程序调试技巧等,还讲述了构建linux 系统的工作原理,用于驱动不同体系结构的配置,linux内核源码树的特性,如何根据需求配制内核运行时的行为,如何扩展系统功能,用于构建完整嵌入式linux 发行版的常用构建系统,usb 子系统和系统配置工具udev 等内容。更重要的是,《嵌入式linux基础教程》阐述了如何修改系统使之满足读者自己的需求,使读者能从中学习一些嵌入式工程中非常有用的提示和技巧。
  《嵌入式linux基础教程》适合linux 程序员阅读,也可作为高等院校相关专业师生的参考读物。
 
 

目录

《嵌入式linux基础教程》
edition   xxxiii
acknowledgments for the second edition   xxxv
about the author   xxxvi
chapter 1 introduction  1
1.1 why linux?   2
1.2 embedded linux today   3
1.3 open source and the gpl   3
1.3.1 free versus freedom   4
1.4 standards and relevant bodies  5
1.4.1 linux standard base   5
1.4.2 linux foundation   6
1.4.3 carrier-grade linux    6
1.4.4 mobile linux initiative: moblin   7
1.4.5 service availability forum    7
1.5 summary   8
1.5.1 suggestions for additional reading   8
chapter 2 the big picture   9
2.1 embedded or not?   10
2.1.1 bios versus bootloader   11
.2.2 anatomy of an embedded system   12
2.2.1 typical embedded linux setup   13
2.2.2 starting the target board    14
2.2.3 booting the kernel    16
2.2.4 kernel initialization: overview   18
2.2.5 first user space process: init   19
2.3 storage considerations   20
2.3.1 flash memory   20
2.3.2 nand flash    22
2.1.1 bios versus bootloader    11
2.2 anatomy of an embedded system   12
2.2.1 typical embedded linux setup   13
2.2.2 starting the target board  14
2.2.3 booting the kernel    16
2.2.4 kernel initialization: overview    18
2.2.5 first user space process: init    19
2.3 storage considerations    20
2.3.1 flash memory    20
2.3.2 nand flash   22
2.3.3 flash usage   23
2.3.4 flash file systems   24
2.3.5 memory space    25
2.3.6 execution contexts   26
2.3.7 process virtual memory    28
2.3.8 cross-development environment    30
2.4 embedded linux distributions   32
2.4.1 commercial linux distributions   33
2.4.2 do-it-yourself linux distributions    33
2.5 summary    34
2.5.1 suggestions for additional reading    35
chapter 3 processor basics  37
3.1 stand-alone processors   38
3.1.1 ibm 970fx  39
3.1.2 intel pentium m   39
3.1.3 intel atom?   40
3.1.4 freescale mpc7448    40
3.1.5 companion chipsets    41
3.2 integrated processors: systems on chip    43
3.2.1 power architecture    44
3.2.2 freescale power architecture   44
3.2.3 freescale powerquicc i   45
3.2.4 freescale powerquicc ii   46
3.2.5 powerquicc ii pro    47
3.2.6 freescale powerquicc iii    48
3.2.7 freescale qoriq?    48
3.1.4 freescale mpc7448   40
3.1.5 companion chipsets   41
3.2 integrated processors: systems on chip   43
3.2.1 power architecture   44
3.2.2 freescale power architecture  44
3.2.3 freescale powerquicc i   45
3.2.4 freescale powerquicc ii   46
3.2.5 powerquicc ii pro  47
3.2.6 freescale powerquicc iii  48
3.2.7 freescale qoriq?  48
3.2.8 amcc power architecture   50
3.2.9 mips   53
3.2.10 broadcom mips   54
3.2.11 other mips   55
3.2.12 arm   55
3.2.13 ti arm  56
3.2.14 freescale arm    58
3.2.15 other arm processors    59
3.3 other architectures   59
3.4 hardware platforms   60
3.4.1 compactpci  60
3.4.2 atca   60
3.5 summary    61
3.5.1 suggestions for additional reading    62
chapter 4 the linux kernel: a different perspective   63
4.1 background    64
4.1.1 kernel versions    65
4.1.2 kernel source repositories   67
4.1.3 using git to download a kernel    68
4.2 linux kernel construction    68
4.2.1 top-level source directory    69
4.2.2 compiling the kernel    69
4.2.3 the kernel proper: vmlinux   72
4.2.4 kernel image components    73
4.2.5 subdirectory layout    77
4.3 kernel build system    78
4.1.1 kernel versions    65
4.1.2 kernel source repositories    67
4.1.3 using git to download a kernel    68
4.2 linux kernel construction   68
4.2.1 top-level source directory   69
4.2.2 compiling the kernel   69
4.2.3 the kernel proper: vmlinux    72
4.2.4 kernel image components    73
4.2.5 subdirectory layout   77
4.3 kernel build system    78
4.3.1 the dot-config    78
4.3.2 configuration editor(s)   80
4.3.3 makefile targets   83
4.4 kernel configuration   89
4.4.1 custom configuration options    91
4.4.2 kernel makefiles   95
4.5 kernel documentation   96
4.6 obtaining a custom linux kernel    96
4.6.1 what else do i need?   97
4.7 summary    97
4.7.1 suggestions for additional reading    98
chapter 5 kernel initialization   99
5.1 composite kernel image: piggy and friends    100
5.1.1 the image object   103
5.1.2 architecture objects   104
5.1.3 bootstrap loader   105
5.1.4 boot messages    106
5.2 initialization flow of control   109
5.2.1 kernel entry point: head.o    111
5.2.2 kernel startup: main.c    113
5.2.3 architecture setup    114
5.3 kernel command-line processing   115
5.3.1 the __setup macro    116
5.4 subsystem initialization    122
5.4.1 the *__initcall macros    122
5.5 the init thread    125
5.2 initialization flow of control   109
5.2.1 kernel entry point: head.o    111
5.2.2 kernel startup: main.c    113
5.2.3 architecture setup    114
5.3 kernel command-line processing    115
5.3.1 the __setup macro   116
5.4 subsystem initialization   122
5.4.1 the *__initcall macros   122
5.5 the init thread   125
5.5.1 initialization via initcalls   126
5.5.2 initcall_debug    127
5.5.3 final boot steps    127
5.6 summary  129
5.6.1 suggestions for additional reading   130
chapter 6 user space initialization   131
6.1 root file system    132
6.1.1 fhs: file system hierarchy standard    133
6.1.2 file system layout   133
6.1.3 minimal file system   134
6.1.4 the embedded root fs challenge   136
6.1.5 trial-and-error method    137
6.1.6 automated file system build tools    137
6.2 kernel’s last boot steps  137
6.2.1 first user space program   139
6.2.2 resolving dependencies   139
6.2.3 customized initial process    140
6.3 the init process   140
6.3.1 inittab   143
6.3.2 sample web server startup script   145
6.4 initial ram disk    146
6.4.1 booting with initrd   147
6.4.2 bootloader support for initrd   148
6.4.3 initrd magic: linuxrc   150
6.4.4 the initrd plumbing    151
6.4.5 building an initrd image    152
6.5 using initramfs   153
6.5.1 customizing    154
6.3.1 inittab    143
6.3.2 sample web server startup script.    145
6.4 initial ram disk   146
6.4.1 booting with initrd    147
6.4.2 bootloader support for initrd    148
6.4.3 initrd magic: linuxrc    150
6.4.4 the initrd plumbing   151
6.4.5 building an initrd image    152
6.5 using initramfs   153
6.5.1 customizing initramfs    154
6.6 shutdown   156
6.7 summary   156
6.7.1 suggestions for additional reading    157
chapter 7 bootloaders   159
7.1 role of a bootloader    160
7.2 bootloader challenges    161
7.2.1 dram controller   161
7.2.2 flash versus ram   162
7.2.3 image complexity   162
7.2.4 execution context   165
7.3 a universal bootloader: das u-boot   166
7.3.1 obtaining u-boot   166
7.3.2 configuring u-boot   167
7.3.3 u-boot monitor commands    169
7.3.4 network operations   170
7.3.5 storage subsystems   173
7.3.6 booting from disk   174
7.4 porting u-boot   174
7.4.1 ep405 u-boot port   175
7.4.2 u-boot makefile configuration target   176
7.4.3 ep405 first build    177
7.4.4 ep405 processor initialization   178
7.4.5 board-specific initialization   181
7.4.6 porting summary   184
7.4.7 u-boot image format   185
7.5 device tree blob (flat device tree)   187
7.3.6 booting from disk   174
7.4 porting u-boot  174
7.4.1 ep405 u-boot port   175
7.4.2 u-boot makefile configuration target    176
7.4.3 ep405 first build    177
7.4.4 ep405 processor initialization   178
7.4.5 board-specific initialization   181
7.4.6 porting summary   184
7.4.7 u-boot image format   185
7.5 device tree blob (flat device tree)   187
7.5.1 device tree source  189
7.5.2 device tree compiler   192
7.5.3 alternative kernel images using dtb   193
7.6 other bootloaders   194
7.6.1 lilo   194
7.6.2 grub   195
7.6.3 still more bootloaders   197
7.7 summary   197
7.7.1 suggestions for additional reading    198
chapter 8 device driver basics   201
8.1 device driver concepts    202
8.1.1 loadable modules    203
8.1.2 device driver architecture    204
8.1.3 minimal device driver example    204
8.1.4 module build infrastructure    205
8.1.5 installing a device driver   209
8.1.6 loading a module    210
8.1.7 module parameters    211
8.2 module utilities    212
8.2.1 insmod    212
8.2.2 lsmod   213
8.2.3 modprobe   213
8.2.4 depmod   214
8.2.5 rmmod   215
8.2.6 modinfo    216
8.3 driver methods    217
8.1.5 installing a device driver    209
8.1.6 loading a module   210
8.1.7 module parameters   211
8.2 module utilities   212
8.2.1 insmod   212
8.2.2 lsmod   213
8.2.3 modprobe    213
8.2.4 depmod   214
8.2.5 rmmod   215
8.2.6 modinfo    216
8.3 driver methods   217
8.3.1 driver file system operations    217
8.3.2 allocation of device numbers  220
8.3.3 device nodes and mknod   220
8.4 bringing it all together   222
8.5 building out-of-tree drivers   223
8.6 device drivers and the gpl   224
8.7 summary   225
8.7.1 suggestions for additional reading   226
chapter 9 file systems   227
9.1 linux file system concepts     228
9.1.1 partitions   229
9.2 ext2   230
9.2.1 mounting a file system   232
9.2.2 checking file system integrity    233
9.3 ext3   235
9.4 ext4   237
9.5 reiserfs    238
9.6 jffs2   239
9.6.1 building a jffs2 image    240
9.7 cramfs   242
9.8 network file system    244
9.8.1 root file system on nfs   246
9.9 pseudo file systems   248
9.9.1 /proc file system   249
9.9.2 sysfs    252
9.4 ext4    237
9.5 reiserfs    238
9.6 jffs2    239
9.6.1 building a jffs2 image   240
9.7 cramfs   242
9.8 network file system   244
9.8.1 root file system on nfs   246
9.9 pseudo file systems   248
9.9.1 /proc file system   249
9.9.2 sysfs  252
9.10 other file systems   255
9.11 building a simple file system    256
9.12 summary   258
9.12.1 suggestions for additional reading   259
chapter 10 mtd subsystem   261
10.1 mtd overview    262
10.1.1 enabling mtd services    263
10.1.2 mtd basics   265
10.1.3 configuring mtd on your target    267
10.2 mtd partitions   267
10.2.1 redboot partition table partitioning    269
10.2.2 kernel command-line partitioning    273
10.2.3 mapping driver    274
10.2.4 flash chip drivers    276
10.2.5 board-specific initialization    276
10.3 mtd utilities    279
10.3.1 jffs2 root file system   281
10.4 ubi file system   284
10.4.1 configuring for ubifs   284
10.4.2 building a ubifs image   284
10.4.3 using ubifs as the root file system   287
10.5 summary   287
10.5.1 suggestions for additional reading   288
chapter 11 busybox   289
11.1 introduction to busybox    290
11.1.1 busybox is easy    291
11.2 busybox configuration    291
11.2.1 cross-compiling busybox    293
11.3 busybox operation    293
11.3.1 busybox init   297
11.3.2 sample rcs initialization script   299
11.3.3 busybox target installation    300
11.3.4 busybox applets    302
11.4 summary    303
11.4.1 suggestions for additional reading    304
chapter 12 embedded development environment   305
12.1 cross-development environment    306
12.1.1 “hello world” embedded    307
12.2 host system requirements   311
12.2.1 hardware debug probe   311
12.3 hosting target boards   312
12.3.1 tftp server    312
12.3.2 bootp/dhcp server   313
12.3.3 nfs server     316
12.3.4 target nfs root mount    318
12.3.5 u-boot nfs root mount example   320
12.4 summary    322
12.4.1 suggestions for additional reading    323
chapter 13 development tools   325
13.1 gnu debugger (gdb)   326
13.1.1 debugging a core dump    327
13.1.2 invoking gdb    329
13.1.3 debug session in gdb    331
13.2 data display debugger    333
13.3 cbrowser/cscope   335
13.4 tracing and profiling tools   337
13.4.1 strace    337
13.4.2 strace variations   341
13.4.3 ltrace   343
13.4.4 ps    344
13.4.5 top    346
13.4.6 mtrace  348
13.4.7 dmalloc   350
13.4.8 kernel oops  353
13.5 binary utilities    355
13.5.1 readelf   355
13.5.2 examining debug information using readelf   357
13.5.3 objdump    359
13.5.4 objcopy    360
13.6 miscellaneous binary utilities    361
13.6.1 strip    361
13.6.2 addr2line    361
13.6.3 strings   362
13.6.4 ldd   362
13.6.5 nm   363
13.6.6 prelink   364
13.5.2 examining debug information using readelf    357
13.5.3 objdump   359
13.5.4 objcopy   360
13.6 miscellaneous binary utilities   361
13.6.1 strip   361
13.6.2 addr2line    361
13.6.3 strings   362
13.6.4 ldd   362
13.6.5 nm   363
13.6.6 prelink   364
13.7 summary  364
13.7.1 suggestions for additional reading   365
chapter 14 kernel debugging techniques   367
14.1 challenges to kernel debugging    368
14.2 using kgdb for kernel debugging    369
14.2.1 kgdb kernel configuration    371
14.2.2 target boot with kgdb support    372
14.2.3 useful kernel breakpoints    376
14.2.4 sharing a console serial port with kgdb    377
14.2.5 debugging very early kernel code   379
14.2.6 kgdb support in the mainline kernel   380
14.3 kernel debugging techniques   381
14.3.1 gdb remote serial protocol    382
14.3.2 debugging optimized kernel code    385
14.3.3 gdb user-defined commands   392
14.3.4 useful kernel gdb macros    393
14.3.5 debugging loadable modules   402
14.3.6 printk debugging    407
14.3.7 magic sysreq key    409
14.4 hardware-assisted debugging   410
14.4.1 programming flash using a jtag probe   411
14.4.2 debugging with a jtag probe    413
14.5 when it doesn’t boot    417
14.5.1 early serial debug output    417
14.5.2 dumping the printk log buffer    417
14.5.3 kgdb on panic    420
14.3.4 useful kernel gdb macros   393
14.3.5 debugging loadable modules   402
14.3.6 printk debugging    407
14.3.7 magic sysreq key   409
14.4 hardware-assisted debugging   410
14.4.1 programming flash using a jtag probe   411
14.4.2 debugging with a jtag probe    413
14.5 when it doesn’t boot    417
14.5.1 early serial debug output    417
14.5.2 dumping the printk log buffer    417
14.5.3 kgdb on panic    420
14.6 summary   421
14.6.1 suggestions for additional reading    422
chapter 15 debugging embedded linux applications   423
15.1 target debugging    424
15.2 remote (cross) debugging    424
15.2.1 gdbserver    427
15.3 debugging with shared libraries   429
15.3.1 shared library events in gdb    431
15.4 debugging multiple tasks    435
15.4.1 debugging multiple processes   435
15.4.2 debugging multithreaded applications     438
15.4.3 debugging bootloader/flash code   441
15.5 additional remote debug options    442
15.5.1 debugging using a serial port    442
15.5.2 attaching to a running process    442
15.6 summary   443
15.6.1 suggestions for additional reading    444
chapter 16 open source build systems   445
16.1 why use a build system?    446
16.2 scratchbox   447
16.2.1 installing scratchbox    447
16.2.2 creating a cross-compilation target    448
16.3 buildroot    451
16.3.1 buildroot installation   451
16.3.2 buildroot configuration    451
15.6 summary    443
15.6.1 suggestions for additional reading    444
chapter 16 open source build systems   445
16.1 why use a build system?   446
16.2 scratchbox   447
16.2.1 installing scratchbox    447
16.2.2 creating a cross-compilation target    448
16.3 buildroot    451
16.3.1 buildroot installation    451
16.3.2 buildroot configuration   451
16.3.3 buildroot build   452
16.4 openembedded    454
16.4.1 openembedded composition    455
16.4.2 bitbake metadata   456
16.4.3 recipe basics   456
16.4.4 metadata tasks   460
16.4.5 metadata classes    461
16.4.6 configuring openembedded    462
16.4.7 building images    463
16.5 summary   464
16.5.1 suggestions for additional reading   464
chapter 17 linux and real time   465
17.1 what is real time?    466
17.1.1 soft real time   466
17.1.2 hard real time  467
17.1.3 linux scheduling    467
17.1.4 latency    467
17.2 kernel preemption    469
17.2.1 impediments to preemption   469
17.2.2 preemption models    471
17.2.3 smp kernel     472
17.2.4 sources of preemption latency    473
17.3 real-time kernel patch    473
17.3.1 real-time features   475
17.3.2 o(1) scheduler   476
17.1.3 linux scheduling   467
17.1.4 latency    467
17.2 kernel preemption    469
17.2.1 impediments to preemption   469
17.2.2 preemption models   471
17.2.3 smp kernel    472
17.2.4 sources of preemption latency    473
17.3 real-time kernel patch   473
17.3.1 real-time features    475
17.3.2 o(1) scheduler   476
17.3.3 creating a real-time process    477
17.4 real-time kernel performance analysis    478
17.4.1 using ftrace for tracing    478
17.4.2 preemption off latency measurement    479
17.4.3 wakeup latency measurement    481
17.4.4 interrupt off timing   483
17.4.5 soft lockup detection   484
17.5 summary    485
17.5.1 suggestion for additional reading    485
chapter 18 universal serial bus   487
18.1 usb overview    488
18.1.1 usb physical topology    488
18.1.2 usb logical topology    490
18.1.3 usb revisions   491
18.1.4 usb connectors    492
18.1.5 usb cable assemblies   494
18.1.6 usb modes   494
18.2 configuring usb   495
18.2.1 usb initialization   497
18.3 sysfs and usb device naming    500
18.4 useful usb tools   502
18.4.1 usb file system    502
18.4.2 using usbview   504
18.4.3 usb utils (lsusb)   507
18.5 common usb subsystems    508
18.5.1 usb mass storage class    508
18.1.6 usb modes   494
18.2 configuring usb    495
18.2.1 usb initialization     497
18.3 sysfs and usb device naming    500
18.4 useful usb tools   502
18.4.1 usb file system   502
18.4.2 using usbview   504
18.4.3 usb utils (lsusb)   507
18.5 common usb subsystems    508
18.5.1 usb mass storage class    508
18.5.2 usb hid class    511
18.5.3 usb cdc class drivers    512
18.5.4 usb network support    515
18.6 usb debug    516
18.6.1 usbmon   517
18.6.2 useful usb miscellanea    518
18.7 summary    519
18.7.1 suggestions for additional reading    519
chapter 19 udev   521
19.1 what is udev?    522
19.2 device discovery    523
19.3 default udev behavior.    525
19.4 understanding udev rules    527
19.4.1 modalias    530
19.4.2 typical udev rules configuration    533
19.4.3 initial system setup for udev    535
19.5 loading platform. device drivers    538
19.6 customizing udev behavior.    540
19.6.1 udev customization example: usb automounting   540
19.7 persistent device naming    541
19.7.1 udev helper utilities   542
19.8 using udev with busybox   545
19.8.1 busybox mdev   545
19.8.2 configuring mdev    547
19.9 summary    548
19.9.1 suggestions for additional reading   548
19.6 customizing udev behavior.   540
19.6.1 udev customization example: usb automounting   540
19.7 persistent device naming    541
19.7.1 udev helper utilities   542
19.8 using udev with busybox   545
19.8.1 busybox mdev   545
19.8.2 configuring mdev   547
19.9 summary   548
19.9.1 suggestions for additional reading   548
appendix a gnu public license   549
preamble   550
terms and conditions for copying, distribution, and modification   551
no warranty  555
appendix b u-boot configurable commands  557
appendix c busybox commands   561
appendix d sdram interface considerations   571
d.1 sdram basics    572
d.1.1 sdram refresh     573
d.2 clocking   574
d.3 sdram setup    575
d.4 summary   580
d.4.1 suggestions for additional reading   580
appendix e open source resources   581
source repositories and developer information    582
mailing lists    582
linux news and developments   583
open source legal insight and discussion    583
appendix f sample bdi-2000 configuration file   585
index   593


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